Bank and thrift regulation
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Bank and thrift regulation improvements needed in examination quality and regulatory structure : statement of Charles A. Bowsher, Comptroller General of the United States, before the Committee on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs, House of Representatives

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Published by The Office, The Office [distributor in [Washington, D.C.], [Gaithersburg, MD] (P.O. Box 6015, Gaithersburg 20884-6015) .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Bank examination -- United States.,
  • Deposit insurance -- United States.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementUnited States General Accounting Office.
SeriesTestimony -- GAO/T-AFMD-93-2., Testimony -- GAO/T-AFMD-93-2.
ContributionsUnited States. General Accounting Office.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination27, [2] p.
Number of Pages27
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL14694870M

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Read this book on Questia. Read the full-text online edition of The S&L Debacle: Public Policy Lessons for Bank and Thrift Regulation (). Home Fundamental Reforms for Bank and Thrift Regulation and for Deposit Insurance Notes.   Thrift banks differ from larger commercial banks, like Wells Fargo or Bank of America, because they usually offer higher yields on savings accounts and . banking today and their implications for banking regulation. Chapter 1 addresses the question of why banks are regulated in order to establish the basic purposes, rationale, and goals for bank-ing regulation, and to provide a framework for evaluating bank regulations. Chapter 2 traces the history and development of U.S. banking regulation. The biggest difference between a thrift and a conventional bank is that thrifts are designed to serve U.S. consumers rather than businesses. By law, thrifts must have 65% of their lending.

This book provides an overview of the OCC, outlines directors' responsibilities as well as management’s role, explains basic concepts and standards for safe and sound operation of banks, and delineates laws and regulations that apply to banks. Regulations The process of drafting or revising a regulation involves consultation and review by several divisions and may involve an interagency working group. The work papers include interim and final drafts, notes of discussions, informal interagency memos, comments from the public, interim comment summaries, and reference material. The S&L Debacle: Public Policy Lessons for Bank and Thrift Regulation. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN Cassell, Mark K. (). How Governments Privatize: The Politics of Divestment in the United States and Germany. Washington: Georgetown University Press. ISBN Mason, David L. (). The Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), the successor to the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, was established by Congress on August 9, as the primary federal regulator of all federal and state-chartered savings institutions across the nation that belong to .

Additional Physical Format: Online version: United States. General Accounting Office. Bank and thrift regulation. Washington, D.C.: The Office ; Gaithersburg, MD (P. Bank and thrift regulation: improvements needed in examination quality and regulatory structure: statement of Charles A. Bowsher, Comptroller General of the United States, before the Committee on Banking, Finance and Urban Affairs, House of Representatives - Ebook written by Charles A. Bowsher, United States. General Accounting Office, United States. Indeed, in some respects, thrift charters are more liberal than bank charters. For example, while the Glass-Steagall Act separates commercial banking from investment banking and the Bank Holding Company Act separates banking from commerce, certain thrift holding companies have relatively unfettered financial and commercial powers. Banking regulation is marked by a seeming alphabet soup of regulatory bodies. The regulatory system we have now reflects the diversity of U.S. financial institutions and a number of legislative responses to banking crises that have occurred over time. Today, banks are regulated by multiple authorities, including the Federal Reserve.